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Showing posts with the label employment

Experts Predict Economic Expansion for 2015 and 2016

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Experts predict a few more strong laps around this race track we call our economy. Fifty forecasting experts with the National Association of Business Economics (NABE) believe the U.S. economy will grow at a rapid pace over the next two years. They suspect Gross Domestic Product (GDP) will increase on average 3.1% in 2015 and 2.9% in 2016.   Few can complain about the potential win-win situation brewing that will reward businesses with higher sales and better employment opportunities for job seekers. Experts believe the economy will improve to a point where unemployment dips under 5% by the end of 2016. The advantages of polling experts can help gauge the overall likelihood of success for the nation. These economic gurus have become successful in their fields and have opinions on economic growth and development. Funneling their opinions into useful metrics helps see that the average opinion is positive. Each expert sifts the questionnaire information through their personal

San Diego Employment Numbers Trip But Could Regain Footing from High Technology Firms

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2014 wasn't a great year for job creation in San Diego as employment numbers left much to be desired. According to the Employment Development Department 30,208 jobs were added to the San Diego economy in 2014 missing economist projections ( 1 ). Despite slower than expected growth in construction, professional, health, and scientific jobs the service industry added the most jobs with a 4.86% increase. Employment rates may be on the rise if San Diego focuses closely on high growth industries that already have a solid present in the area. The numbers are not dismal and could indicate a upward swing for 2015. Service jobs are relatively easy to add and mark a level of rising consumer spending on travel, restaurants, and leisure services that mark optimism. These are some of the first jobs added to the economy before higher paying jobs also make their way onto the market. Higher paying employment comes after lower skilled service jobs have made their initial appearance. Industrie

The Footprints to a Solid Career

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Rome wasn't built in a day and neither will your career. Successful careers take a consider amount of effort and time to develop and may not always end the same way you planned when you started. As the market changes and adjusts it is beneficial to roll with the changes and seek out opportunities to learn and develop. At various stages of your life you will be in different career positions that can contribute to your professional development. Young graduates often assume they are going to conquer the world solely through elbow grease. This enthusiasm manifests itself in excitement, motivation, and participation. Even though the pay is not high the new job offers a level of independence, a new apartment, a car, and lots of other goodies that were previously out of reach. Eventually that enthusiasm will wane as they become accustomed to their new money and find out that what they earn is not nearly to feed a family and still live a comfortable lifestyle. They may start to move

2015 Picks Up Employment Steam- Will You Will Be Getting a Raise?

The American economy is picking up steam and zooming forward. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the economy added 257,000 non-farm payroll positions in January ( 1 ). U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez characterizes this employment increase as, " 2015 is picking up right where 2014 left off – with strong, steady, sustained job growth that is leading a dynamic recovery " ( 2 ).  Great news that could have an impact on future wages but who will be getting a raise depends on market position. Even though the unemployment creaked up from 5.6 to 5.7% much of this has been attributed to people jumping back into the job market. When people are not searching for work their numbers are not counted. However, as they engage back in their searches and applying the numbers become more accurate as previously unaccounted for people rejoin the statistical measurement. The value of labor is determined in part by the availability of labor; lower unemployment numbers are good. T

Why are American’s Quitting Their Jobs?

According to a report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics 57.5% of people who left their jobs did so under their own free will. A total of 5.03 million employees were added which boosted the hiring rate to 3.6%. At the same time 2.75 million people resigned in September with a quit rate of 2%. Make no mistake, the job market is heating up and employees are finding options that were not available to them a few years ago. When the economy is poor and employment prospects are low employees naturally stay in their jobs for fear that they will not be successful in securing new employment. Likewise, there may be an abundance of people seeking the same position which raises the stakes when attempting to jump ship. It is often wiser to stay where you are at until things get better. At present the amount of people seeking the same position are 2 to 1. Those are pretty good odds for people who want to beat out the competition. When those odds are 3 or 4 to 1 that makes uncertainty higher. Wh

Trade Deficit Shows Need to Improve Exports

The Commerce Department stated on Tuesday that the trade gap increased in September 7.6% to $43.03. It is much larger than the estimated $38.1 billion. It is believed that an improving GDP will lend to improvements in exports but this not what happened. The results may be long-term or short-term but do reflect a need for the U.S. to adjust its policies to return to a higher exportation status unseen since a generation ago. Exportation is a solid reflector on internal capacities of a nation to meet market demands. Much of the recent decline is associated with global economic factors much outside the control of the U.S. The biggest losses were a 6.5% decline in exports to the European Union, 3.2% to China, and 14.7% to Japan. The losses seem to reflect lower economic activity in all three regions of the globe and may simply be a factor of total consumption.   That doesn’t mean the country can’t improve its export capabilities. Outside of a slower global economy are two major

Grit as a Factor in Employment and College Success

Students enter into college with lots of different hopes and dreams but not all of them finish their programs. Those who make it through despite multiple difficulties have something called grit. That grit that helps someone get through college despite multiple challenges is the same grit that employers should seek out for management positions.  Whether one is enrolling in an undergraduate programs or was just accepted into a doctoral program grit has a factor in their projected success. Doctoral grit has been associated with GPA, hours students spent working on programs, and student overall success (Cross, 2014). Such students are fully engaged. The ability to work on long-term projects despite the difficulties of life, challenges people face, and varying stresses is a remarkable trait. It is hard to judge someone’s grit simply by looking at them or completing a quick assessment. Grit is something tied to the very core of personality of the person and their self-belief in