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Encouraging Small Business Entrepreneurship through Knowledge Development

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Small business and entrepreneurship are hot topics in the U.S. economy and it is believed they will make significant contributions to America’s reemergence as a nation of opportunity and growth. A study of 200 small business entrepreneurs in the U.S. and India help highlight how education, personal development and focus contribute to growth (Scales, 2014).   There is an increasing need to teach entrepreneurship and small business development in college to match skills to knowledge needed in the market. He argues: 1.       The need to teach the difference between small business development; and, 2.       The actual behaviors of entrepreneurs and small business owners. Education can play a significant part in developing and growing the entrepreneurial class. Small business owners should move more toward an entrepreneurial orientation and seek to further reach the next level in business volume. They will need new knowledge to function at their maximum capacity. This re

Dark Horse Coffee Brands Their Urban Barnyard

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Dark Horse Coffee may be small but attracts a lot of locals from the urban barnyard. As a start-up operation the idea was to transplant knowledge from the Hawaiian coffee fields to the coastal lifestyle of San Diego. The young entrepreneur Daniel Charlson used his experimentation with coffee beans to create a successful business that frequently has a line out the door. You can’t miss the big black horse on their sign.     It isn’t a large coffee shop and seating is limited but this doesn’t seem to stop anyone. They don’t have a lot of room for people to sit and lounge around with their laptops but they do have an efficient visitor flow mechanism that ensures customers don’t have to wait long before being served. Many of the patrons walk-in and out from the street buying their coffee on the go.   They are a specialty shop that focuses on international French press, pour over, and cold brew coffee. Unlike larger chains they operate in small batch production and strateg

Building a Stronger Entrepreneurial Society

Stronger national development requires the fostering of entrepreneurs and the matching of their talent to venture capitalism and financial resources. Without the creation of pathways and support many of these small businesses will not grow to a level that furthers economic development in a substantial way. According to a paper by Carl Schramm (2004) the business environment should foster the development of consistent small business growth and not focus only on mature firms; both develop together. Bias was built into the system when discussing macroeconomic systems and this has impacted how Americans view small business. When WWII was coming to a close much of the U.S. was already developed. Large businesses were the focus of both micro and macroeconomics. The needs of smaller businesses and their contributions have generally been ignored as an economic engine. The entrepreneurial system within the U.S. is based on high-impact entrepreneurs, mature firms, governments, and un

Small Business Start-Ups Create Economic Impact

Economic growth is important for cities, states, and nations. Research by Donald, et. al. (2009) helps decision-makers understand that a healthy balance between large and small business development puts economies on the right track to flourish while encouraging positive budget balances. Their study shows that the activity of business start ups foster growth not only in one state but also the surrounding states. Some businesses will succeed and others will fail but the economic activity of constant start ups is a revenue generator.  The U.S. Small Business Administration reports small business activity is one of the major engines to economic growth and creates a majority of new jobs. It is possible that smaller businesses that are entrepreneurial by nature engage in research and development that have an even larger impact on the economy (Acs and Plummer, 2005). Both jobs and innovation are needed to keep the economic engine running at ideal speeds.  There are a number of eco