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Showing posts with the label business courses

Business Students Should Learn Operations Management

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Freshly minted graduate students have new knowledge and youthful energy but don't always have a great concept of how all of this fits together in an actual operation. The information is disconnected in their minds and a wider framework is difficult to find. An article in the Journal of Operations Management helps us understand what might be learned in a course that teaches practical operations management (Ellington, et. al.. 2014).  Operations management requires a broad base of knowledge and covers concepts such as distribution, marketing, human resources, packaging, manufacturing processes, operation flows and a whole host of other issues. Student regularly learn these concepts one at a time throughout their MBA courses but don't take them all together.  Offering an operations management course will help students put together all of the major concepts together into a single operation example. The student will be able to see how the things they learned create a flow

Learning the Art of Negotiation

Negotiation is something we do every day of our lives but we may not be overtly aware of it. We often think of negotiating contracts, wages and other business related concepts but we also negotiate for many small things like household chores and car maintenance. Learning negotiation skills in college or through your own personal reading can make a large difference in helping you get what you want while not compromising your values. American society doesn’t provide enough daily experience negotiating like you might find in Europe or other parts of the world. People that go to the grocery story may negotiate the price, find deals, and look for other ways to save money. Even though just about anything can be negotiated Americans don’t often see it this way; the stated price is the only price. This is partly the problem with a nation accustomed to large department stores. Despite 66% of people trying to negotiate big ticket items in the past 6-months, negotiation skills are still

Basic College Writing Enhances Business Course Outcomes

Business relies heavily on communication skills used in varying fields of study. Students often lack fundamental writing skills that can transfer into credibility, effectiveness and opportunity in the future. According to a 2013 paper by Dr. Carolyn Sturgeon colleges can do a better job at teaching students higher levels of written communication skills that can translate into productive projects.  Students often resist courses in writing and English composition because they view these skills as secondary to their goals. Similar to the difficulty of getting your teenage children to throw out the trash these students are not excited about the tedious tasks of grammar, spelling, formatting, sentence structure, and citations. There is no denying that such classes are often boring and uninspiring and on the surface appear to be unnecessary. Some students may need to complete 5-6 composition courses before effectively moving into their respective fields of study. There are other

Business Communication Courses and Strategies of the Top 50 Schools

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W hat did you say? Today is the time of massive communication that spans the globe over. From presenting a concept to stakeholders to sending an email the ability to communicate effectively in business makes a huge difference in the successful completion of goals. To write and speak clearly is to use the medium of thought transference effectively so as to ensure that others both understand and process messages accurately. Such important communication concepts are becoming more important as business school graduates seek ways of influencing their environment and gain recognition. Business schools are an important avenue of learning about communication and how to effectively communicate important concepts and principles. The majority of business communication courses were taught by the business department versus other departments (Wardrope and Bayless, 1999). It is through this content that students can learn about how, when and where to effectively communicate in the modern b