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Showing posts with the label leadership styles

Leading and Learning as a Cure for Pathological Management Styles

Learning organizations are likely to be more successful in developing new methods to compete on the market. Research by Michie & Zumitzavan (2012) furthers the argument that those organizations that foster learning and are managed by learning leaders are more successful than those who are reactive and focused on pathological styles. Learning leadership is progressive, open-minded, humanistic, and goal orientated that results in higher firm development and profits.   Leadership and learning are two components that come together to foster development. The way in which leaders learn has an impact on how they act as administrators. Those that engaged in all four learning styles action, thinking, feeling and assessing others are more capability of using multiple leadership styles such as challenging, inspiring, enabling, modeling, and encouraging (Brown and Posner, 2001).  Learning is one way in which organizations can continually renew themselves versus accepting the fate

Higher Employee Performance through Path-Goal Theory

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The Path-Goal theory helps to define methods and pathways to successful achievement of organizational objectives. The theory postulates that leadership behavior is subject to the satisfaction, motivation, and performance of their subordinates. Strong leadership implies that such leaders should engage in behaviors that enhance employee abilities and reduce deficiencies. Organizations can do this through coaching, counseling, servant leadership, and engagement. The specific style of leadership and direction are based upon two contingencies that include the environment and the employee characteristics. Through the use and application of Path-Goal Theory organizations can realize higher performance. The path-goal theory was originally developed by Robert House in 1971 and then revised again in the mid 1990’s. The theory came into business as a strong approach of managing employees and improving upon their overall performance. The ultimate goal is to provide them a path to achieve

Learning and Leadership Influence on the Financial Performance of Organizations

Leaders often wonder how they can improve upon organizational effectiveness and encourage higher levels of employee learning and development. A study conducted by Jonathan Michie from Oxford University and Vissanu Zumitzavan from Mahasarakham University sheds further light on how learning styles and leadership abilities influence the entire organizational performance. As organizations try to encourage higher levels of financial and personal development in a global market they may consider these connections as significant contributors Leadership style can have a significant influence on the overall financial success of the organization (Ulrich and Ulrich, 2010). It is through this implementation of proper management techniques that systematic changes in the organization can be made that create higher levels of performance. It is the leadership style that attracts and pushes appropriate visions for organizational members.   A second major component of successful influence on

Servant Leadership being Chosen by Many Leaders

Servant leadership is now being selected by senior leaders and boards of trustees as a style of leadership over authoritarian, democratic, or lassiez-faire styles.   Spears (2005) wrote: In countless for-profit and not-for-profit organizations today we are seeing traditional, autocratic, and hierarchical modes of leadership yielding to a different way of working—one based on teamwork and community, one that seeks to involve others in decision making, one strongly based in ethical and caring behavior, and one that is attempting to enhance the personal growth of workers while improving the caring and quality of our many institutions. This emerging approach to leadership and service is called servant-leadership. (p. 1) The idea of servant leadership seems to be paradoxical.   How can one be a leader if they are a servant?   But it is much more about the style of leadership than the name itself.   Imagine a stereotypical authoritarian style where the employee is not put first no