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Showing posts with the label customer service

Keeping Customers at the Center of Your Business

Customer satisfaction is the vital sign that acts like a pulse to the health of the rest of the organization. Companies that keep their customers in focus win over the long run. Ensuring that policies & procedures, training, recruitment, facilities and resources are focused on customer satisfaction is important for sustainability. All businesses are in the business of serving customers. How many cars would sell if they didn’t serve the needs of their customer? Would it be any different for a spa or vacation? Companies that make the mistake of not running their daily operations with the customer in focus eventually start seeing the errors of their ways through poor customer retention and sales.  Policies & Procedures: The internal mechanisms and operations should ensure every activity is focused on the customer.  Training: Training should seek to ensure quality completion of jobs and friendly customer interactions; it should set the standard for emplo

Poor Service Quality Impacts Customer Perception of Businesses

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Service quality can make or break your business if you don't keep track of customers impressions. Business often focus on the physical appearance, atmosphere, cost, and offerings but sometimes fail to see the underbelly of what will make their place a success. Service quality can have a huge impact on customer retention and make or break whether a business can stay open. Consider a restaurant that has a trendy name, great atmosphere and is all the rave among core crowds. The owners spend a great deal of time advertising and putting everything together but failed to train their staff on how to treat customers. The lines are long, the staff is rude, orders are messed up, and the price is high. People may love what your business has to offer but they are not likely to return if their experience was poor. This is one of the reasons why trendy businesses are popular one year and close their door the next.  Proper service is like frosting on the cake even though it is the smallest

The Importance of Unlocking Customer Non-Verbal Cues

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Customers are the lifeblood to any business. If the customer walks away unhappy you may not only lose their lifetime patronage but also deter their friends from frequenting your business as well. The type of interaction between the company and the customer will often determine whether or not they will have a positive impression of your business. According to an article in the Journal of Marketing the ability of company employees to read the non-verbal cues of customers will influence customer affect (Puccinelli, et. al. 2013). Most of us have experienced poor interaction with company employees from time-to-time. It isn’t always the big things a business does that makes or breaks our impressions. Most businesses know how to avoid these large issues through processes and procedures.. It is the small actions and interactions that can hurt or damage customer perception. Poor customer interaction often is a result of under trained employees that don’t read the customers needs an

Improving Customer Care Quality Through Efficiency

Service efficiency and service quality have often been considered two different dimensions that don’t work well together. As service quality improves the efficiency of service moves downward. Likewise, as service quality moves down efficiency can move upwards. Conventional wisdom may not be accurate. A study by Talluri, Kim and Schoeherr (2013) used both transactional and survey data to show how service quality and efficiency can work together. What they did find was that service efficiency should be improved through the development of higher levels of technology before moving into service demand quality. Without efficiency in place quality becomes more expensive. Focusing on efficiency and then on quality appears to push growth higher.   Efficiency allows for the use of less resources to service customer’s needs. As core service functions are defined the processes and procedures streamline to cut out any waste. There may not be a lot of options in the types of services of

Why are Customer Service and Trust Important for Customer Retention?

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Abundance by Dr. M. Abel Service is an important component of customer retention, business development, and improved product sales. Companies that fail to develop customer service also fail to develop trust with their customers which mean they may lose a lifetime of patronage. Research by Webber, et. al. (2012) discusses provider service orientation and how this predicted cognitive trust much more than customer agreeableness.  Trust is the root of all commerce and relationships. Cognitive trust is grounded in the perception of another’s reliability, dependability and competence (McAllister, 1995). The way in which customers view customer service representatives is important for the retention of those customers.  Let us assume for a moment that you have a problem with a product and bring it forward to a customer service representative. When the representative doesn’t appear to understand the problem, doesn’t follow through on company promises, and makes a number of mis

Does Combining Customer Service with Sales Improve Company Performance?

Customer service and sales are both important functions for an organization. What happens when we put them together? A study by Jasmand, et. al. (2012) delves into the nature of creating a mbidextrous sales-service functions. Their findings determine a net positive result of helping customers with their problems and offering those products/services that better suit their needs. It creates some confusion among employees but seems to improve customer satisfaction and overall sales volume. There is a natural mental barrier between customer service representatives and sales. Customer service representatives do not view their job as including sales and therefore are less focused on this activity. A lack of perspective limits the abilities of firms to create higher sales through a level of mental merging of the two functions. Training, time and commitment will be needed to bridge the gap and improve upon the integration of both constructs. Ambidextrous goals and behavior in servi