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Showing posts with the label management theory

Traits of Leadership over a Lifetime

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Life has it stages and leadership skills move through those stages with the person. As people change and grow there will be different emphasis on leadership skills as challenges are mastered and new knowledge presented. Despite the changes of life there are some similarities across the stages that run the course throughout a lifetime (Nelson, Schroeder & Welpman, 2014).  In the beginning of a leader’s life rudimentary skills form in the home and create a foundation for leadership. As life continues this framework is used as a place where new knowledge is learned, incorporated, and then utilized to achieve goals. The process of learning, challenging and developing continues throughout a person’s career.  Leaders are unique creatures when compared to many other people. They are always seeking to develop and grow regardless of the circumstances they are in. Even though the stages of their life change they seem to hold consistent characteristics that continue to push them to

Leadership Through Stakeholder Collaboration

Leadership is a necessary component of moving groups from one performance level to another. Leaders provide a focal point for collective action, a voice to the will of the people and decision-making capacity when problems arise. Responsible leaders are able to bring stakeholders together to accomplish some important goal. This isn’t possible without considering the multiple stakeholders in any worthwhile activity. According to Doh & Quigley (2014) leaders are able to use psychological and knowledge-based pathways to impact micro/individual, team, organizational, and societal outcomes. Such leaders have the personal capacity to see how daily activities can impact larger groups of stakeholders to create higher levels of impact. Responsible leaders can impact organizational processes and outcomes to achieve goals. Consider the different types of stakeholders interested in an organization and the levels by which these can be categorized. The individual worker has a stake in term

Are Satisfied Employees Less Willing to Help Others?

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Organizations can be regarded as a system of relationships between individuals. Social exchange theory (e.g. Cropanzano & Mitchell, 2005) provides a general framework to understand these relationships, arguing that positive interactions are likely to increase cooperation among individuals in organizations. While there is much information about how cooperative relationships evolve, far less is known about how these relationships affect each other. Now, taking into account that employees have multiple relationships as they are dealing with coworkers and with supervisors, the question is whether cooperation in one direction may affect cooperation in the other.  From an organizational perspective, career systems may be viewed as a means to create cooperative relationships with employees. At the same time, however, they can reduce cooperation among coworkers as they will compete for higher positions. This mechanism was found in a study among Dutch organizations: the more satisfied emp

Growing Global Brands-Understanding International Culture

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artwork by Dr. Murad Abel With pressed three piece suits and blazing red ties they look out over the ocean and wonder just how far they need to travel to sell products in lands yet untapped. It wasn’t long ago they built towers where their grandfathers once tilled tobacco, corn, and beans. The montblanc pens are not yet dry but the ideas have long been spent. Just beyond their reach, opportunities again bound but the paths are now covered in asphalt trails that lead back to where brick and mortar ends. Just beyond that wall is something new, a place to gain footing, a vine perhaps that is hardy enough to tow products world round.   Once again the good times could roar if shined shoes are scuffed in the knee deep fields of prosperity.    Executives seek once again to find new opportunities to grow their businesses and create expanding opportunities. The global marketplace requires new theoretical lenses that are much sharper than the theories of the past. Global product posi

The Bounded Rationality of Stakeholder Theory

Stakeholder Theory is an organizational management perspective that attempts to defined the nature and purpose of firms/corporations within society. According to its founder Milton Friedman, the purpose of a firm is embedded almost exclusively in the production of wealth for shareholders (Friedman, 1970). Since this time, the concept of stakeholder has been expanded to include the idea that other entities have a particular stake, or interest, in the organization and can influence its success or failure. The theory defines who are the stakeholders in an organization and their rights and obligations to the shareholders as well as society in general. The root of the theory is based off of the premise that its purpose is the, " identification of moral or philosophical guidelines for the operation and management of the corporation " (Donaldson & Preston, 1995). The theory helps to foster the understanding that the needs of the owners should be realized first before other con