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Showing posts with the label organizational efficiency

Helping Managers Develop Strategies for Time

Time is an expendable resources that has limitations and adds up to either contribute or detract from a company’s success. You may have heard the phrase time is money. In business few things could be truer. The way in which managers use their time can have large implications for whether or not activities are aligned to the actual needs of the company. Time management isn’t a fruitless event and can lead to greater personal and organizational rewards.  Managing time and knowing where to spend time are two important considerations. Someone can be efficient with every moment of their life but if they are spending their time in the wrong activities it doesn’t do them much good. Likewise, on an organizational level percentages of time can lead to thousands, if not millions, of dollars of revenue.  Distraction of the Available: It is easy for managers to get distracted in the small everyday tasks they must complete each day. The reports, daily events, and employee concerns k

Book Review: Natural Capitalism: The Next Industrial Revolution

Natural Capitalism is a book that focuses on the natural development of the economic system. The work by Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, and Hunter Lovins discusses the nature of technology and development within the economic system and how this impacts the natural environment. It discusses in great deal the next industrial revolution, economic waste, costs within organizations, food development, financial solutions, and human capitalism. Through the chapters the reader will be brought through painstaking detail the components of economic system and how the circumstances are right for another transformational development. The book makes the theoretical argument that the next industrial revolution will be a natural environment one. At present the economic system focuses heavily on human capacity but will soon be more focused on natural resources and the efficient use of such resources. People could live twice as well on half as much energy and resource waste. The creation of efficient en