Posts

Showing posts with the label global firms

Creating Successful Global Marketing Strategies

Companies moving onto the global scene are conducting business around the world 24/7. Increased trade requires new research to help understand the factors that make the difference.  Research by Akkrawimut, et. al. (2011) of 154 Thailand jewelry exporters helps define what makes some companies successful global marketers. Their strategies can are used to encourage other executives to formulate their own approaches.  Global marketing strategy is important for reaching those customers most likely to purchase products. It can be defined as the marketing activities a company uses to turn global through standardization and integration (Cavusgil, et. al 2004). Focus shifts from domestic to a dynamic global far-reaching approach.  Companies cannot engage in global marketing without some capabilities. Teece et. al. (1997) defines these capabilities as the firm’s ability to integrate, build, and reconfigure competencies (internal and external) to address shifting market needs. The co

Managing the Complex Web of Global Subsidiaries

Global firms often work with a number or partners in order to move their products into multiple markets. Global firms use subsidiaries to help them promote and distribute their products. Research by Homburg, et. al. (2012) seeks to categorize the varying types of firms available on the market to help multinational organizations do a better job at managing across countries, cultures, and markets.   Their research finds five different types of firms that have their own benefits and detractors. Global firms attempt to maintain competitiveness by using subsidiaries to create effective international reach. These firms are more aligned with regional and local differences in market characteristics. Problems result when global marketing loses a level of efficiency and effectiveness in the development of methods of managing these multiple distribution fingers.  Drawing from configuration theory of organizations it is possible to use subsidiary archetypes to understand the varying na