Tuesday, July 2, 2013

U.S. and India Commit to Higher Education Cooperation

The United States is one of the most favorable locations for Indian students with over 100,000 coming here to earn degrees.  Based upon a Higher Education Summit in 2012 and 2013 leaders from both countries agreed to fostering greater cooperation in the areas of faculty exchanges, research cooperation, using technology-enabled educational strategies (e-learning), community college cooperation, and greater higher education partnerships.
Such programs help in creating greater opportunities that further broadens students and faculty’s perspectives on international educational issues. 

Students live in a much more complex world and will need to learn how to work with others across multiple boards and time zones. India and the U.S. have strong relationships and similarities in culture that makes it easier to connect for higher education purposes. This connection fosters greater cultural awareness and international collaboration among colleges.

The programs also have additional benefits in terms of creating greater awareness of new technologies and developments coming from India. India is a high technology emerging nation that finds customers in the U.S. and Europe for their new products. This innovation is generated from their universities and entrepreneurs.  Helping Americans and Indians connect for development creates greater opportunities for mutual intellectual growth. 

Some of the programs are as follows:

Fulbright-Nehru Partnership: Faculty exchange.

Raman Fellowships: Junior Indian faculty placed for Post-Doctoral work with American Universities.

Development of Community Colleges: Greater mutual development of colleges.

Connect India Program: U.S. students placed with Indian Colleges.
Centre of Excellence on Cyber Systems: Cyber system collaboration.

India-Support for Teacher Education Program: Three month teacher training in the U.S.

Passport to India: Helping students study in India.

EducationUSA: Informing Indian students about opportunities to study in the U.S.

No comments:

Post a Comment